[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ fullwidth=”on” _builder_version=”3.22.3″ custom_padding=”0|0px|0|0px|false|false”][et_pb_fullwidth_slider _builder_version=”4.0.9″ background_image=”https://duemetri.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/two-birds-flying-53531.jpg” parallax=”on” animation_style=”fade” hover_enabled=”0″ button_text_size__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_text_size__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_text_size__hover_enabled=”off” button_text_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_text_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_text_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_border_width__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_border_width__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_border_width__hover_enabled=”off” button_border_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_border_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_border_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_border_radius__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_border_radius__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_border_radius__hover_enabled=”off” button_letter_spacing__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_letter_spacing__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_letter_spacing__hover_enabled=”off” button_bg_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_bg_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_bg_color__hover_enabled=”off”][et_pb_slide heading=”Migrazione di un dominio” use_bg_overlay=”off” use_text_overlay=”on” text_overlay_color=”rgba(104,104,104,0.42)” text_border_radius=”30″ _builder_version=”4.0.9″ background_image=”https://duemetri.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/two-birds-flying-53531.jpg” background_enable_image=”on” parallax=”on” button_on_hover=”on” child_filter_saturate=”100{089514aacf384c4b182ae0a967215d68b95ce58c915fdb347723b61c0909aa5f}” child_filter_brightness=”100{089514aacf384c4b182ae0a967215d68b95ce58c915fdb347723b61c0909aa5f}” child_filter_contrast=”100{089514aacf384c4b182ae0a967215d68b95ce58c915fdb347723b61c0909aa5f}” child_filter_invert=”0{089514aacf384c4b182ae0a967215d68b95ce58c915fdb347723b61c0909aa5f}” child_filter_sepia=”0{089514aacf384c4b182ae0a967215d68b95ce58c915fdb347723b61c0909aa5f}” child_filter_opacity=”100{089514aacf384c4b182ae0a967215d68b95ce58c915fdb347723b61c0909aa5f}” hover_enabled=”0″ button_text_size__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_text_size__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_text_size__hover_enabled=”off” button_text_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_text_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_text_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_border_width__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_border_width__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_border_width__hover_enabled=”off” button_border_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_border_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_border_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_border_radius__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_border_radius__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_border_radius__hover_enabled=”off” button_letter_spacing__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_letter_spacing__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_letter_spacing__hover_enabled=”off” button_bg_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_one_bg_color__hover_enabled=”off” button_two_bg_color__hover_enabled=”off”]

How to plan the migration of a site and the migration of a domain without having moments of blackout

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Migration of a site, Migration of a domain

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When the relationship with the provider breaks down, sometimes it is necessary to change.The migration from one provider to another is apparently a simple operation but must be planned very well to avoid major problems

The first thing you need to check is the TLD (top level domain) of our domain. Generally it is a regional tld (2 char like .it, .de, .fr etc.) or a classic .com/net/org, but there are an infinity of them. For convenience, let’s talk only about these two TLDs, leaving to specific requests the further information on others.

In a visibility point of view, all domains are similar. substantial differences usually concernes the property. for example .com is owned, while a .it is property of Italian Authority (NIC) and you are just allowed to use it.Each domain has an owner and an administrator. If you own your own domain, that’s no problem.

How can I find out if I am the owner? It’s very simple. there are many sites that allow you to do this type of whois query. The best known is https://who.is. After the introduction of the GDPR, many services hide this information for privacy reasons. Alternatively, you can always get this sort of survey of your current provider.

Now that you have found out whether or not you own your domain, let’s move on to the second step.

Let’s see the hierarchy of this information. The domain is a name to which mainly 2 values ​​are associated, indicating the place on the network where to find all the information concerning the domain itself (where are the sites, who manages mail and much more). These two values ​​are the NAMESERVERs and the new provider supplies them. this means that we may have purchased a domain in France having the nameservers in Italy.

Inside the nameservers there is the DNS ZONE, the set of information that physically manages the domain. Each of this information has a specific type, a record that identifies its species. The records that manage the mail are of type MX, those that have the information related to the site are of type A etc.

Having an accurate map of the DNS ZONE is a great step to make a hassle-free migration.

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Domain migration goes live

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To give an example, we could have a domain purchased on Aruba (Italy), the nameservers on a Dutch provider and in the dns area specify that the mail (mx records) are managed by google (usa) and the site (record a ) is hosted on a French server. That’s Internet

At this point, a good strategy is to rebuild the situation by creating a new ZONE on the new provider.

So let’s start by configuring the domain on the new provider. It will only serve to prepare the field when it is time to do the real migration of the domain.

First, you need to reconstruct the DNS ZONE as previously acquired, with all the records.

Let’s imagine that changing provider means moving the site and / or mail elsewhere so the new references will need to be set up.

After this phase, we have a domain on the new provider and a DNS ZONE configured with the new values, we can start migrating the site.

Considering that you don’t always break up as friends, that’s a good start make a clone of your site and bring it to the new server using the appropriate method according to the type of site (a simple ftp for traditional sites, cloning using plugins for wordrpess sites, etc.). Of course it will be invisible to the world, but it doesn’t matter.

The new server hosting your site certainly has an ip address that you will have used for cloning. To find out if you have done everything right, before making the final switch, it is important to check that everything works.

If you have Windows, in the folder C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\ there is a file named ‘hosts‘, a text file (often from the system it is forbidden to write it for security reasons so, if necessary, right-click, properties, enable writing), where you can add your domain and the new IP address.

The ‘hosts’ file allows you to browse your newly migrated site and verify that everything is fine while the rest of the world continues to see the old site.

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Domain migration – last step

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Now that the site has migrated and the mail MX records have been updated, let’s move on to the last step, the domain. It is time to ask the current provider for the authorization code for the migration (authcode).

If you own the domain or, if you are not but the domain has the same name or name attributable to your company and the TLD is a .it, or sooner or later (usually sooner) everything is done.

If the domain is a .com and the current provider does not cooperate, the road is longer and, if you are neither owner nor administrator, even more uncertain.

From the moment you ask for the authcode, the provider understands that you want to change and, if it is a professional (and the accounts are in order), it releases the authcode without problems.

Once you get of the authcode, the migration procedures are upon responsibility of the new provider. If everything is in order in a few days everything is resolved, otherwise it is longer.

In this way, when the domain is migrated, the nameservers are already configured, the site and mail are already working, there will be no blackouts and no one will notice anything.

If you use mail clients (outlook, thunderbird or others) it will be necessary at this point to reconfigure them (smtp, pop3, user and password) for the new mail server. if you use services such as gmail, there won’t be any problem

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